Scripts

Looking for an abridged script for your Shakespeare production? Check out our archive of abridged scripts.

In exchange for providing these, all we ask is that you credit Wichita Shakespeare Company and the name of the editor as listed. We would also like to hear if you use our script for a production! Find us on Facebook at:

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The actor’s scripts formatted as book signature half sheets in landscape, and the director’s scripts are formatted as full sheets in portrait. You may need to experiment to determine what flipping orientation you need to set your printer for.

Two Gentlemen of Verona – Edited and adapted by Kevin Sowers. This edit was produced by the Wichita Shakespeare Company in 2013 with a running time of approximately 1 hour and 50 minutes. In this edit, much of the Julia/Luchetta “suitor” scene has been cut for brevity.

Two Gentlemen of Verona

Two Noble Kinsmen – Edited and adapted by Dan Schuster. This edit was produced by the Wichita Shakespeare Company in 2006 with a running time of approximately 2 hours. In this edit and adaptation, Emilia was haunted literally by the ghost of her childhood friend, Flavina. In the scene with Emilia and her waiting woman, the ghost of Flavina was given the waiting woman’s lines. In the play, Emilia is put in a very difficult situation – having to choose between Palamon and Arcite, neither of which she really desires. In Emilia’s alter scene at Diana’s temple, Flavina’s ghost interrupted and stopped a sucide attempt by her.

Two Noble Kinsmen (Actor’s Script)
Two Noble Kinsman (Director’s Script)

Macbeth – Edited and adapted by Mark Schuster

Macbeth (Actor’s Script)
Macbeth (Director’s Script)

The Merry Wives of Windsor – Edited and adapted by Jane Tanner

Merry Wives of Windsor (Actor’s Script)
Merry Wives of Windsor (Director’s Script)

Pericles – Edited and adapted by Dan Schuster. This edit was produced by the Wichita Shakespeare Company in 2008 with a running time of approximately 2 hours. One of the most successful adaptations, in Dan’s opinion, the show was highly theatrical in nature with a cast of nine (4 women and 5 men) playing all the roles. The role of Gower was changed to that of a collaborative chorus, with varying members of the ensemble performing each chorus bit. The actor portraying Pericles played no other role. The ensemble also portrayed various theatrical elements as called for in the script – waves of the sea, a ship’s mast, etc. If you need further information on the actual character breakdown used for each ensemble member, please let us know.

Pericles (Actor’s Script)
Pericles (Director’s Script)

Romeo and Juliet – Edited and adapted by Jane Tanner

Romeo and Juliet (Actor’s Script)
Romeo and Juliet (Director’s Script)

Taming of the Shrew – Edited and adapted by Vonda Schuster

Taming of the Shrew (Actor’s Script)
Taming of the Shrew (Director’s Script)

Troilus and Cressida – Edited and adapted by Dan Schuster. This edit was produced by the Wichita Shakespeare Company in 2011 with a running time of 2 hours and 10 minutes. The last act was cut and rearranged immensely, in what hopefully aded to the dramatic flow of action. Ulysses killed Patroclus on stage in an attempt to rile Achilles. Achilles only entered to see Hector leaving the side of Patroclus’ body, which he had stumbled upon. The roles of Thersites and Calchas were changed to women. At the top of her only scene, Calchas enters blessing the Greek warriors in a riutalistic ceremony.

Troilus and Cressida (Actor’s Script)
Troilus and Cressida (Director’s Script)

Twelfth Night – Edited by Vonda Schuster

Twelfth Night (Actor’s Script)
Twelfth Night (Director’s Script)

The Winter’s Tale – Edited and adapted by Dan Schuster. This edit has been produced twice – in 2002 by the Wichita Shakespeare Company and 2005 by Derby Community Theatre, with a running time of approximately 2 hours. In this edit and adaptation, the roles of Autolycus and Time have been doubled, with Time literally becoming Autolycus to further the action in the second half of the show. It also helped to centralize the character of Time (since Time, as a “theme,” is crucial to the play).

The Winter’s Tale (Actor’s Script)
The Winter’s Tale (Director’s Script)